Big Tits

What Are Big Tits?

Artist’s Statement

I was reluctant to talk about this issue for a long time because of how girls, in particular, responded to it. This issue of having “big boobs” is viewed by so many as a privilege. Yeah, I could buy alcohol without getting carded when I was 15, but I also have to pay about 70 dollars for a sports bra that fits. There are definitely trade-offs. The bigger issue, however, is that these girls who were 15 wanted to have huge boobs so that they would be taken more seriously, look older, attract more 15 year old boys, etc. They wanted big boobs so that they would be better equipped to play the game of being a woman in a patriarchic society, as media portrayals of boobs are as these incredibly sexualized objects used to ascend in the power structure of patriarchy while simultaneously perpetuating it. In my DIY project, I aim to introduce a new perspective of boobs—not as sexual power tools, just as boobs.

In my internet zine, I chose my words very carefully in an attempt to use sexual language while creating a tone that is anything but sexual. I call my boobs my tits, not because I like the abrasive connotations of the word, but because I want to emphasize that they are just a pair of tits—they don’t symbolize my status in society, and my cup size doesn’t say anything about me or the rest of my body. I don’t want to call them breasts, like they are a piece of white poultry meat, and I won’t be coy about how I refer to my rack just because media in the patriarch has come up with so many clever terms for regarding this part of my body as sexual. Women like Kim Kardashian and Audrina Patridge have gained their status in society by accepting their role as sexualized objects, but as we’ve seen recently in the case of Kim Kardashian’s pregnancy, these women receive so little respect from society without the physical attributes that made them famous. It is so incredibly frustrating to me that “boobs” are so important to everyone because of the role that they play in a woman’s status.

A famous sociologist Jean Baudillard theorized that the only way to fight against mainstream was to do something that wouldn’t be reproduced by the media for massive consumption. In support of this theory, I think DIY projects are so important because they introduce new ideas into a relatively safe place where mass consumption isn’t the goal and messages and intentions are less likely to be distorted. I wanted the voice in my project to be aggressive, but I wanted the portrayal to be simple. I think that the almost mild medium of a zine (that basically just looks like a blog post) challenges the voice that media pretends to give women by using my words rather than images and being straightforward in the message I want to convey.  I don’t want my DIY project to be directed at mainstream product’s audiences—it isn’t a mainstream idea, and it’s not something I think can be changed overnight. I want it to be discussed among those willing to discuss, and I want it to be known more than I want it to be advertised.

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